Fiddle

Learning FIDDLE at Maine Fiddle Camp. So many fiddlers, so many tunes, so little time!! Adults, kids, all levels of ability…
How does the teaching work at Camp?

Well it’s simple. Campers are grouped by the ability they indicate on their registration form into classes, each named for a bird. There are 6 levels, “beginner beginner” to “advanced advanced”, and each of those levels has an adult and a youth (under 18) track. So that’s 12 “birds”. Each group has a home “nest” and during the June weekend camps different instructors rotate through the nests.. At the June and August week-long camps, each class has a primary teacher that they meet with for a session each morning plus a review session in the afternoon, while different instructors rotate through the nests during second period of the morning. That’s for the levels 3 through 6, i.e. the beginner intermediates to the advanced advanced. The beginners (levels one and 2) are taught by a team, still divided up into different levels (bird names) but students usually stay with the same teacher throughout the camp session. . Each teaching session (there are three per day) is between an hour and an hour and a half long., slightly less for the younger kids.

The beginning levels concentrate more on technique and less on repertoire, while the more advanced levels assume knowledge of technique and concentrate on teaching repertoire, though some technique, like bowing and ornamentation unique to that repertoire, will certainly be covered. Obviously not all campers know what level they are best suited for when they sign up, so there is often some “switching around” at the beginning of camp. So campers should not feel they are “pigeonholing” themselves when they sign up.. Give it your best shot on the registration form and your instructors will move you if necessary.

Lissa and the Puffins
Classes are held outdoors under tents. The vary in size from 3 or 4 to as many as 20 or 25, though the normal size is 10-15.  To the left is a picture showing Lissa Schneckenburger with her “Puffins”. . Classes often work on a particular tune to present at camper concerts, which are held each day. Here’s a video of such a concert. This is Steve Muise and the Mergansers, an advance youth group.

    June Weekend I (June 15-17)

  • Greg Boardman

    Greg is the founder of Maine Fiddle Camp and has been a major inspiration for many fiddlers over the last three and a half decades throughout all of Maine. He has steered a career in folk music by playing for concerts and dances, especially by learning the regional "DownEast" fiddling style from the likes of Otto Soper and Simon St. Pierre, and by teaching music and fiddling in the Auburn area. Contact Greg at bowandstring @ gmail.com. Also see gregboardman.bandcamp.com and soundcloud.com/bowandstring.
     
  • Jessie Boardman

    Jessie fiddles for contra and family dances across New England, and she sometimes sneaks the cello into dance sets. Jessie teaches fiddle to all ages at Maine Fiddle Camp, Sandy Island Suzuki Camp, at workshops, and in her private studio. Dancing her first contra dance as a child to the band Swallowtail in New Hampshire, Jessie later moved to Maine, where she happily resides. Jessie can be reached at (207) 344-3106.
     
  • George Fowler

    George trained classically as a youngster then started his fiddling voyage in the late 1970's, learning tunes from lobsterman & folk fiddler Albert Collins of South Blue Hill. He was a founding member of Oakum Bay String Band (1981-2011), the long-time host band for the monthly Blue Hill dance, which had a remarkable 34 year run (1976-2010). In addition to playing and teaching the fiddle tunes of Maine, Appalachia and the Canadian Maritimes, George has a strong interest in Irish traditional music. (more)
     
  • Ellen Gawler

    Ellen Gawler is a celebrated fiddler, masterful in many styles, including Irish, French-Canadian, Maritime, Shetland and New England. Her fiddling possesses sparkling clarity, authentically rooted in tradition while at the same time inventive and playful. Her lively delivery of traditional fiddling has sent many a contra dance hall into whirling delight with soaring melodies and driving rhythms. (more)
     
  • Pascal Gemme

    Pascal Gemme has a degree from St-Laurent College (Montreal) in arranging and classical/jazz guitar, he has since been searching for seldom-heard songs and melodies, interpreting them in his unique and unmistakable style. Originally inspired by his fiddling grandfather, he has played with (and learned from), most of today’s great Quebecois fiddlers and singers. Since 2003, he has taught intermediate and advanced fiddle classes at Montreal's folk music school, École des Arts de la Veillée. (more)
     
  • Elaine Malkin

    Elaine Malkin has played the violin since the age of five and prefers a clean, crisp, yet ripping, New England fiddle style. She was a part of the resurgence of contra dances in the early seventies in Maine, having learned from Otto Soper and Dudley Laufman. In her spare time she plays with horses, photography, and trains dogs for agility competitions. See the web site www.northstarsisters.com.
     
  • Steve Muise

    Steve Muise has been fiddling his family's Downeast Style for many years. (His parents are 1st and 2nd generation Nova Scotians) He founded the Franklin County Fiddlers, a group of high school musicians that tours around Maine and way beyond displaying, promoting and learning about fiddle styles. Steve is a graduate of Berklee College of Music, and is a stringed instrument teacher in the MBRSD schools (Farmington area). Steve was honored with the "Maine Music Educator of the Year" award in 2007 from MMEA. Steve enjoys playing all styles, ranging from Downeast (maritime), Québécois, Celtic, and jazz, and can be seen playing music with his dad Paul, Boréal Tordu, Frigate, Muisette and the Franklin County (more)
     
  • Carter Newell

    When Carter isn’t working on aquaculture projects he loves to play his fiddle with The Old Grey Goose, and with his wife Kaity and The Newell Family Band. He has collected tunes from old Maine fiddlers like Arnold Kennedy from Aroostook County, and has traveled extensively with his fiddle throughout the British Isles and the Maritime Provinces. 7 Creek Lane Damariscotta ME O44543 207-563-8440
     
  • Kaity Newell

    Kaity teaches fiddle in Damariscotta and has played for dances for many years with The Maine Country Dance Orchestra, and with the band The Lady Bugs. A native of Great Britain, Kaity has brought many a fine tune from the British Isles to our local dances. Kaity also plays viola in the local community orchestra and has four children, all of whom play music and come to camp every year. 7 Creek Lane Damariscotta ME 044543 207-563-8440
     
  • Maisie Newell

     
  • Julia Plumb

    Julia lives and teaches fiddle and clawhammer banjo in Belfast, Maine. Equally at home on the stage and on the dance floor, Julia loves the percussive interplay between traditional music and dance forms and has enjoyed soaking up bits and pieces from players and dancers throughout New England and in Québec, Ireland, Brittany, and the southern Appalachians. Julia plays with Baron Collins-Hill in their duo Velocipede (www.velocipedemusic.com) and loves connecting people with music and dance. In addition to teaching at camps and in face-to-face lessons, Julia maintains freefiddlelessons.com, where she creates YouTube fiddle lesson videos and learning materials. Julia has achieved her 2010 goal to make her life more like Maine Fiddle Camp!
     
  • Maggie Robinson

    Maggie Robinson has been teaching fiddle since 2003.  She began taking fiddle lessons the age of 10 and became concert mistress of her school orchestra during her senior year.   Many years later she discovered Contradancing and fell in love with the music  She took the violin out of the closet and began learning fiddle tunes. She completed a course in 2003 at the Hartt College of Music, Theater, & Dance on “Teaching Fiddling”. Currently she is teaching at several locations in greater Portland, and also regularly calls for contra dances around the state.
     

    June Week (June 17-22)

  • Jennifer Armstrong

    Visit Jennifer's website (http://www.jenniferarmstrong.com/). 233 Poors Mill Road Belfast ME 04915 207-322-2265
     
  • Greg Boardman

    Greg is the founder of Maine Fiddle Camp and has been a major inspiration for many fiddlers over the last three and a half decades throughout all of Maine. He has steered a career in folk music by playing for concerts and dances, especially by learning the regional "DownEast" fiddling style from the likes of Otto Soper and Simon St. Pierre, and by teaching music and fiddling in the Auburn area. Contact Greg at bowandstring @ gmail.com. Also see gregboardman.bandcamp.com and soundcloud.com/bowandstring.
     
  • Éric Favreau

    Éric Favreau comes from a family of traditional musicians and has spent a great deal of time playing with other fiddlers, learning their repertoire and studying their varied styles. Éric has explored and exploited various sources including archives and personally made field recordings and has accumulated a rich and fascinating repertoire. Over the years, he has garnered a profound understanding and vast knowledge of Québécois traditional music. As an individual, and in various groups including Entourloupe, Éric has vast experience in (more)
     
  • Ellen Gawler

    Ellen Gawler is a celebrated fiddler, masterful in many styles, including Irish, French-Canadian, Maritime, Shetland and New England. Her fiddling possesses sparkling clarity, authentically rooted in tradition while at the same time inventive and playful. Her lively delivery of traditional fiddling has sent many a contra dance hall into whirling delight with soaring melodies and driving rhythms. (more)
     
  • Pascal Gemme

    Pascal Gemme has a degree from St-Laurent College (Montreal) in arranging and classical/jazz guitar, he has since been searching for seldom-heard songs and melodies, interpreting them in his unique and unmistakable style. Originally inspired by his fiddling grandfather, he has played with (and learned from), most of today’s great Quebecois fiddlers and singers. Since 2003, he has taught intermediate and advanced fiddle classes at Montreal's folk music school, École des Arts de la Veillée. (more)
     
  • Elaine Malkin

    Elaine Malkin has played the violin since the age of five and prefers a clean, crisp, yet ripping, New England fiddle style. She was a part of the resurgence of contra dances in the early seventies in Maine, having learned from Otto Soper and Dudley Laufman. In her spare time she plays with horses, photography, and trains dogs for agility competitions. See the web site www.northstarsisters.com.
     
  • Lilly Pearlman

    Lilly Pearlman has grown up in Maine immersed in the musical traditions of Scotland and Cape Breton, performing with family band Highland Soles since the age of nine. Through her experiences living and studying in New York City and Salvador da Bahia, Brazil, she has continued to explore and incorporate influences from various other musical genres--from bluegrass to samba to funk-- into her unique Celtic-based fiddle sound. (more)
     
  • Julia Plumb

    Julia lives and teaches fiddle and clawhammer banjo in Belfast, Maine. Equally at home on the stage and on the dance floor, Julia loves the percussive interplay between traditional music and dance forms and has enjoyed soaking up bits and pieces from players and dancers throughout New England and in Québec, Ireland, Brittany, and the southern Appalachians. Julia plays with Baron Collins-Hill in their duo Velocipede (www.velocipedemusic.com) and loves connecting people with music and dance. In addition to teaching at camps and in face-to-face lessons, Julia maintains freefiddlelessons.com, where she creates YouTube fiddle lesson videos and learning materials. Julia has achieved her 2010 goal to make her life more like Maine Fiddle Camp!
     
  • Maggie Robinson

    Maggie Robinson has been teaching fiddle since 2003.  She began taking fiddle lessons the age of 10 and became concert mistress of her school orchestra during her senior year.   Many years later she discovered Contradancing and fell in love with the music  She took the violin out of the closet and began learning fiddle tunes. She completed a course in 2003 at the Hartt College of Music, Theater, & Dance on “Teaching Fiddling”. Currently she is teaching at several locations in greater Portland, and also regularly calls for contra dances around the state.
     

    June Weekend II (June 22-24)

  • Jessie Boardman

    Jessie fiddles for contra and family dances across New England, and she sometimes sneaks the cello into dance sets. Jessie teaches fiddle to all ages at Maine Fiddle Camp, Sandy Island Suzuki Camp, at workshops, and in her private studio. Dancing her first contra dance as a child to the band Swallowtail in New Hampshire, Jessie later moved to Maine, where she happily resides. Jessie can be reached at (207) 344-3106.
     
  • Éric Favreau

    Éric Favreau comes from a family of traditional musicians and has spent a great deal of time playing with other fiddlers, learning their repertoire and studying their varied styles. Éric has explored and exploited various sources including archives and personally made field recordings and has accumulated a rich and fascinating repertoire. Over the years, he has garnered a profound understanding and vast knowledge of Québécois traditional music. As an individual, and in various groups including Entourloupe, Éric has vast experience in (more)
     
  • Ellen Gawler

    Ellen Gawler is a celebrated fiddler, masterful in many styles, including Irish, French-Canadian, Maritime, Shetland and New England. Her fiddling possesses sparkling clarity, authentically rooted in tradition while at the same time inventive and playful. Her lively delivery of traditional fiddling has sent many a contra dance hall into whirling delight with soaring melodies and driving rhythms. (more)
     
  • Tamora Goltz

    Tamora has been playing the fiddle since the early 1980’s and teaching for more than two decades. She teaches a broad range of music and created the first strings program at Ashwood Waldorf school. She is currently part of the teaching staff at 317 Main Community Music Center. Tamora is primarily known for her music in the Irish/Celtic tradition and in the world of Contra Dance.   (more)

     
  • Elaine Malkin

    Elaine Malkin has played the violin since the age of five and prefers a clean, crisp, yet ripping, New England fiddle style. She was a part of the resurgence of contra dances in the early seventies in Maine, having learned from Otto Soper and Dudley Laufman. In her spare time she plays with horses, photography, and trains dogs for agility competitions. See the web site www.northstarsisters.com.
     
  • Julia Plumb

    Julia lives and teaches fiddle and clawhammer banjo in Belfast, Maine. Equally at home on the stage and on the dance floor, Julia loves the percussive interplay between traditional music and dance forms and has enjoyed soaking up bits and pieces from players and dancers throughout New England and in Québec, Ireland, Brittany, and the southern Appalachians. Julia plays with Baron Collins-Hill in their duo Velocipede (www.velocipedemusic.com) and loves connecting people with music and dance. In addition to teaching at camps and in face-to-face lessons, Julia maintains freefiddlelessons.com, where she creates YouTube fiddle lesson videos and learning materials. Julia has achieved her 2010 goal to make her life more like Maine Fiddle Camp!
     
  • John Pranio

    John started his musical life as a drummer before the age of ten, but through the encouragement of "his poor mother," took up the quieter acoustic guitar in his teens. In high school John met a banjo player and was encouraged to try the fiddle. He was quickly hooked, and by the age of 20 began playing his "rhythmic" style of fiddling for contra dances around New York and New Jersey.  In 1989 John moved to Maine and within a few years started the North Whitefield Contra dance with his wife Toki Oshima, and caller Ted Sannella. (more)
     
  • Maggie Robinson

    Maggie Robinson has been teaching fiddle since 2003.  She began taking fiddle lessons the age of 10 and became concert mistress of her school orchestra during her senior year.   Many years later she discovered Contradancing and fell in love with the music  She took the violin out of the closet and began learning fiddle tunes. She completed a course in 2003 at the Hartt College of Music, Theater, & Dance on “Teaching Fiddling”. Currently she is teaching at several locations in greater Portland, and also regularly calls for contra dances around the state.
     
  • Lissa Schneckenburger

    A new England fiddler and folk singer, Lissa grew up in Maine as an active member of the folk music and dance community, where she cut her teeth as a musician at a very young age. She has continued to explore music throughout her life, leading to her graduation from The New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Massachusetts (2001). Her list of mentors includes Greg Boardman, Alasdair Fraser, David Kaynor, and Hankus Netsky. While embracing a diverse pallet of musical influences, she still stays true to her New England roots. For more info on Lissa, check out her website at www.lissafiddle.com
     

    August Week I (August 5-10)

  • Éric Favreau

    Éric Favreau comes from a family of traditional musicians and has spent a great deal of time playing with other fiddlers, learning their repertoire and studying their varied styles. Éric has explored and exploited various sources including archives and personally made field recordings and has accumulated a rich and fascinating repertoire. Over the years, he has garnered a profound understanding and vast knowledge of Québécois traditional music. As an individual, and in various groups including Entourloupe, Éric has vast experience in (more)
     
  • George Fowler

    George trained classically as a youngster then started his fiddling voyage in the late 1970's, learning tunes from lobsterman & folk fiddler Albert Collins of South Blue Hill. He was a founding member of Oakum Bay String Band (1981-2011), the long-time host band for the monthly Blue Hill dance, which had a remarkable 34 year run (1976-2010). In addition to playing and teaching the fiddle tunes of Maine, Appalachia and the Canadian Maritimes, George has a strong interest in Irish traditional music. (more)
     
  • Mary Fraser

    Mary Fraser began her musical life by training in classical violin for thirteen years, concluding with a Suzuki method violin teacher certification.  She then left the classical music world and traveled extensively throughout the UK, immersing in the traditional music of her heritage.  Carrying right on into the southern US states to study the old time fiddle styles of eastern Kentucky, West Virginia and North Carolina.  (more)
     
  • Elaine Malkin

    Elaine Malkin has played the violin since the age of five and prefers a clean, crisp, yet ripping, New England fiddle style. She was a part of the resurgence of contra dances in the early seventies in Maine, having learned from Otto Soper and Dudley Laufman. In her spare time she plays with horses, photography, and trains dogs for agility competitions. See the web site www.northstarsisters.com.
     
  • Steve Muise

    Steve Muise has been fiddling his family's Downeast Style for many years. (His parents are 1st and 2nd generation Nova Scotians) He founded the Franklin County Fiddlers, a group of high school musicians that tours around Maine and way beyond displaying, promoting and learning about fiddle styles. Steve is a graduate of Berklee College of Music, and is a stringed instrument teacher in the MBRSD schools (Farmington area). Steve was honored with the "Maine Music Educator of the Year" award in 2007 from MMEA. Steve enjoys playing all styles, ranging from Downeast (maritime), Québécois, Celtic, and jazz, and can be seen playing music with his dad Paul, Boréal Tordu, Frigate, Muisette and the Franklin County (more)
     
  • Kaity Newell

    Kaity teaches fiddle in Damariscotta and has played for dances for many years with The Maine Country Dance Orchestra, and with the band The Lady Bugs. A native of Great Britain, Kaity has brought many a fine tune from the British Isles to our local dances. Kaity also plays viola in the local community orchestra and has four children, all of whom play music and come to camp every year. 7 Creek Lane Damariscotta ME 044543 207-563-8440
     
  • Hannah Otten

    Hannah Otten grew up in upstate New York, living both near the banks of the Hudson River and within the Catskill Mountains. She began playing classical viola at the age of 9, picked up a violin at age 15, arrived at Maine Fiddle Camp, and kept on playing traditional fiddle styles from there. Hannah has a clear and playful teaching style that serves camp well as a member of the beginner team. (more)
     
  • Julia Plumb

    Julia lives and teaches fiddle and clawhammer banjo in Belfast, Maine. Equally at home on the stage and on the dance floor, Julia loves the percussive interplay between traditional music and dance forms and has enjoyed soaking up bits and pieces from players and dancers throughout New England and in Québec, Ireland, Brittany, and the southern Appalachians. Julia plays with Baron Collins-Hill in their duo Velocipede (www.velocipedemusic.com) and loves connecting people with music and dance. In addition to teaching at camps and in face-to-face lessons, Julia maintains freefiddlelessons.com, where she creates YouTube fiddle lesson videos and learning materials. Julia has achieved her 2010 goal to make her life more like Maine Fiddle Camp!
     
  • Alden Robinson

    Alden Robinson learned to play the fiddle as a child growing up in coastal Maine. His earliest lessons came from Tamora Goltz, Katie Newell, and from the teachers at Maine Fiddle Camp. In college, he studied Irish fiddle in Ireland at University College Cork, and in several pubs. For the past five years or so he has toured and recorded with The Press Gang, an Irish trad band from Portland. He also loves playing for contra dances and performs to several dance bands, including "Riptide", which features Owen Marshall and Glen Loper. (more)
     
  • Maggie Robinson

    Maggie Robinson has been teaching fiddle since 2003.  She began taking fiddle lessons the age of 10 and became concert mistress of her school orchestra during her senior year.   Many years later she discovered Contradancing and fell in love with the music  She took the violin out of the closet and began learning fiddle tunes. She completed a course in 2003 at the Hartt College of Music, Theater, & Dance on “Teaching Fiddling”. Currently she is teaching at several locations in greater Portland, and also regularly calls for contra dances around the state.
     
  • Lissa Schneckenburger

    A new England fiddler and folk singer, Lissa grew up in Maine as an active member of the folk music and dance community, where she cut her teeth as a musician at a very young age. She has continued to explore music throughout her life, leading to her graduation from The New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Massachusetts (2001). Her list of mentors includes Greg Boardman, Alasdair Fraser, David Kaynor, and Hankus Netsky. While embracing a diverse pallet of musical influences, she still stays true to her New England roots. For more info on Lissa, check out her website at www.lissafiddle.com
     

    August Week II (August 12-17)

  • Jennifer Armstrong

    Visit Jennifer's website (http://www.jenniferarmstrong.com/). 233 Poors Mill Road Belfast ME 04915 207-322-2265
     
  • Liz Faiella

    An Irish fiddler with New England contradance flair and classical sensitivities, Liz Faiella has captivated audiences at premier folk venues, contradances, and festivals around New England. (more)
     
  • Mary Fraser

    Mary Fraser began her musical life by training in classical violin for thirteen years, concluding with a Suzuki method violin teacher certification.  She then left the classical music world and traveled extensively throughout the UK, immersing in the traditional music of her heritage.  Carrying right on into the southern US states to study the old time fiddle styles of eastern Kentucky, West Virginia and North Carolina.  (more)
     
  • Mia Friedman

    Mia Friedman is a virtuosic fiddler and singer. She is largely influenced by American roots music and old-time Appalachian traditions, and blends this with contemporary experimental music in her compositions. She graduated from New England Conservatory in 2012 where she studied with Anthony Coleman, Carla Kihlstedt, and Hankus Netsky, and is an active composer, performer, and educator. Mia has a private studio of fiddle students, and also teaches at two El Sistema inspired music programs in the Berkshires. (more)
     
  • Ellen Gawler

    Ellen Gawler is a celebrated fiddler, masterful in many styles, including Irish, French-Canadian, Maritime, Shetland and New England. Her fiddling possesses sparkling clarity, authentically rooted in tradition while at the same time inventive and playful. Her lively delivery of traditional fiddling has sent many a contra dance hall into whirling delight with soaring melodies and driving rhythms. (more)
     
  • Elaine Malkin

    Elaine Malkin has played the violin since the age of five and prefers a clean, crisp, yet ripping, New England fiddle style. She was a part of the resurgence of contra dances in the early seventies in Maine, having learned from Otto Soper and Dudley Laufman. In her spare time she plays with horses, photography, and trains dogs for agility competitions. See the web site www.northstarsisters.com.
     
  • Claude Méthé

    Claude Méthé, is a self-taught fiddler, his style reflects most particularly the eighteen years he lived in the region of Lotbinière, Québec, on the south side of the St-Lawrence river not far from Québec City. Today, he resides in Ste-Béatrix, Québec, in the Lanaudière region, known worldwide as the epicenter of Québec trad music. (more)
     
  • Kaity Newell

    Kaity teaches fiddle in Damariscotta and has played for dances for many years with The Maine Country Dance Orchestra, and with the band The Lady Bugs. A native of Great Britain, Kaity has brought many a fine tune from the British Isles to our local dances. Kaity also plays viola in the local community orchestra and has four children, all of whom play music and come to camp every year. 7 Creek Lane Damariscotta ME 044543 207-563-8440
     
  • Maisie Newell

     
  • Hannah Otten

    Hannah Otten grew up in upstate New York, living both near the banks of the Hudson River and within the Catskill Mountains. She began playing classical viola at the age of 9, picked up a violin at age 15, arrived at Maine Fiddle Camp, and kept on playing traditional fiddle styles from there. Hannah has a clear and playful teaching style that serves camp well as a member of the beginner team. (more)
     
  • Ed Pearlman

    Ed Pearlman enjoys many styles of fiddle music but is best known for Scottish and Cape Breton fiddling, often working with his wife, dancer Laura Scott, and their family band, Highland Soles (www.highlandsoles.com). Since the mid 1990s, he has taught fiddle in Portland, and written the music column for Scottish Life magazine. Ed has worked closely with top artists such as Alasdair Fraser, Natalie MacMaster, Tony Cuffe, Aly Bain, Jerry Holland and many others, especially when he directed the Boston Scottish Fiddle Club, 1981-99. His latest CD is On the Edge with son Neil on piano. Ed has played various Celtic and American styles, Eastern European and classical. For more info & some fiddling resources, see http://www.edpearlman.net - 207-650-2030
     
  • Julia Plumb

    Julia lives and teaches fiddle and clawhammer banjo in Belfast, Maine. Equally at home on the stage and on the dance floor, Julia loves the percussive interplay between traditional music and dance forms and has enjoyed soaking up bits and pieces from players and dancers throughout New England and in Québec, Ireland, Brittany, and the southern Appalachians. Julia plays with Baron Collins-Hill in their duo Velocipede (www.velocipedemusic.com) and loves connecting people with music and dance. In addition to teaching at camps and in face-to-face lessons, Julia maintains freefiddlelessons.com, where she creates YouTube fiddle lesson videos and learning materials. Julia has achieved her 2010 goal to make her life more like Maine Fiddle Camp!
     
  • Alden Robinson

    Alden Robinson learned to play the fiddle as a child growing up in coastal Maine. His earliest lessons came from Tamora Goltz, Katie Newell, and from the teachers at Maine Fiddle Camp. In college, he studied Irish fiddle in Ireland at University College Cork, and in several pubs. For the past five years or so he has toured and recorded with The Press Gang, an Irish trad band from Portland. He also loves playing for contra dances and performs to several dance bands, including "Riptide", which features Owen Marshall and Glen Loper. (more)
     
  • Maggie Robinson

    Maggie Robinson has been teaching fiddle since 2003.  She began taking fiddle lessons the age of 10 and became concert mistress of her school orchestra during her senior year.   Many years later she discovered Contradancing and fell in love with the music  She took the violin out of the closet and began learning fiddle tunes. She completed a course in 2003 at the Hartt College of Music, Theater, & Dance on “Teaching Fiddling”. Currently she is teaching at several locations in greater Portland, and also regularly calls for contra dances around the state.
     
  • Pam Weeks

    Pam sings and plays several instruments in the folk trio, T-Acadie, is fiddler and singer for the Maine-based Cajun dance band, Jimmyjo & the Jumbol'Ayuhs, plays fiddle and mountain dulcimer in the contradance band, Scrod Pudding, and performs solo or with guitar player and caller Bill Olson. She is an accomplished tunesmith and has composed scores of tunes, from lively jigs and reels, to entrancing airs and beautiful waltzes. Pam has toured throughout the U.S. with her bands, playing for contradances, concerts, and teaching at festivals and workshops. (more)
     

Ready to sign up? Go to the registration page. See you at Camp!!