August Week II

Featuring:

  • Jennifer Armstrong

    Visit Jennifer's website (http://www.jenniferarmstrong.com/). 233 Poors Mill Road Belfast ME 04915 207-322-2265
     
  • Susie Burke

    Susie Burke is an exceptional children's performer, as her many fans both young and older will testify. Drawing on her unique background as both a professional musician and an early childhood teacher, she presents a program that is entertaining, educational, involving, inspiring, and of high musical caliber. Themes of friendship, the environment, and a child's sense of self are often a focus, along with lots of songs that are just plain fun. From the beginning of her musical career, Susie Burke has been involved with children. In fact, it was only after leaving her job as a preschool teacher that she was able to devote herself full-time to music. (more)

     
  • Baron Collins-Hill

    Baron grew up playing the mandolin in Maine and recently graduated from Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts with a degree in music performance and ethnomusicology. Versed in traditional fiddle music, bluegrass, and jazz, he is known for his rhythmic experimentation and unique harmonic sense on both the mandolin and the tenor guitar. Baron plays with fiddler Julia Plumb in their duo Velocipede(www.velocipedemusic.com).
     
  • John Coté

    Guitarist John Coté has been performing for contra dances since he first fell in love with this pastime back in 1995. John did his music studies at the Berklee College of Music in Boston as well as the University of Maine at Augusta and incorporates a variety of influences in addition to what he has absorbed through the music of New England contra dance. Bringing his love of community and potent dance music, John has earned national recognition on the contra dance circuit, touring the United States with fiddler and fellow Maine Fiddle Camp instructor Ed Howe in their duo, Perpetual e-Motion. (more)
     
  • Corey DiMario

    Double-bassist Corey DiMario is one of the most sought after accompanists in the acoustic music scene. He has performed at major festivals and concert venues across North America, Europe and Australia. A diverse musician, Mr. DiMario adds rock solid, low-end accompaniment and driving rhythm to any musical situation. A founding member of the string band sensation Crooked Still, DiMario brings a diverse musical palette and energetic approach to an ensemble. (more)
     
  • Louisa Engle

    Louisa started playing violin as and eight-year-old through her public school's strings program. In high school, she taught private violin lessons to younger students. Her music became more fiddley by the day. As a sophomore at Marlboro College, she founded a contra dance band, named "Wendy and the Lost Boys" by their admirers. The band studied with musician Keith Murphy. Louisa then hosted a monthly contra dance series that ran for four years. (more)
     
  • Ellen Gawler

    Ellen Gawler is a celebrated fiddler, masterful in many styles, including Irish, French-Canadian, Maritime, Shetland and New England. Her fiddling possesses sparkling clarity, authentically rooted in tradition while at the same time inventive and playful. Her lively delivery of traditional fiddling has sent many a contra dance hall into whirling delight with soaring melodies and driving rhythms. (more)
     
  • Daniel Hawkins

    The music of Boston-based cellist and composer Daniel Hawkins springs first of all from the dense forests, rolling hills, and crumbling cities of his childhood Pennsylvania. After leaving the Keystone State, Daniel earned undergraduate degrees in composition (studying with Paul Lansky, Steve Mackey, and Dan Trueman) and cello performance (Sophie Shao, Susannah Chapman) from Princeton University as well as a master's degree in contemporary improvisation from the New England Conservatory (Natasha Brofsky, John Mallia, Anthony Coleman, Tanya Kalmanovitch). (more)
     
  • Ed Howe

    Born into a musical family, Ed started playing fiddle at the age of 4, learning Suzuki method. His musical interests cover a wide spectrum from Bluegrass to Celtic and beyond and he has been a regular instructor for Maine Fiddle Camp since 2003. Howe has an extensive electronics background, and took an interest in the electric violin. He plays a 5-string NS Design electronic violin and is a featured artist on the NS design artist page. (more)
     
  • McKinley James

    McKinley James is a cellist living in the Boston area. She has performed across the Northeast with her band, the Irregulars. Performance highlights include performing at the Dance Flurry weekend and New World Festival. The Irregulars also won First Place in the Young Traditions Vermont competition in 2011 and recorded their CD, Waiting for Wisdom, in 2013. She has also performed with Isabel Oliart on the national radio show Says You, and opened for the Irish band Teada at the Burren. (more)
     
  • Bennett Konesni

    Bennett Konesni grew up in Appleton, Maine, 10 miles downstream of Maine Fiddle Camp.  He was naturally drawn into the strong communities of old-time music, sailing, and farming in the area.  At thirteen he shipped as a deckhand aboard local schooners, sailing Penobscot Bay and learning the traditional work songs of the tall ships as he raised sails and hauled anchor.  Later, at Middlebury College, Bennett co-founded the student farm and spent six months studying Zulu farming songs in South Africa.  (more)
     
  • Carter Logan

    Carter plays banjo with his band “Jerks of Grass” and also plays for dances. He has a unique repertoire and we are pleased to have him on staff at camp www.jerksofgrass.com
     
  • Glen Loper

    Glen gives private lessons for mandolin and tenor banjo from his home in Portland, ME, and plays for contradances throughout the Northeast, and at festivals across the country with bands such as Frigate, Riptide, The Steampacket, and The Sharktones. Visit Glen at www.glenloper.com. 49 Brackett St, Portland ME, 04102 Phone: 207-837-8249 LINKS: "Frigate" , Riptide
     
  • Elaine Malkin

    Elaine Malkin has played the violin since the age of five and prefers a clean, crisp, yet ripping, New England fiddle style. She was a part of the resurgence of contra dances in the early seventies in Maine, having learned from Otto Soper and Dudley Laufman. In her spare time she plays with horses, photography, and trains dogs for agility competitions. See the web site www.northstarsisters.com.
     
  • Owen Marshall

    Vogue magazine calls musician Owen Marshall "A guitar/mandolin/banjo player rivaled in character only by the occasional three-pronged carrot" (Vogue 2009). Owen has accompanied and collaborated with many of traditional music's top performers including Aoife Clancy, Liz Carroll, Darol Anger, John Doyle, Andrea Beaton, Jerry Holland, Ari & Mia Friedman and his own traditional Irish trio "The Press Gang". (more)
     
  • Jeremiah McLane

    The music of composer, accordionist, and pianist Jeremiah McLane is a unique blend of Franco-American, Celtic, jazz, and roots influenced music. In 1980 Jeremiah started studying Celtic music and began playing the accordion, influenced largely by the Bothy Band and Dedanann. He studied with Chicago accordionist Jimmy Keane and Cape Breton pianist Doug McPhee. In the early 1990s he helped start two bands with strong traditional New England roots: The Clayfoot Strutters and Nightingale, both of which are active today. In 2003 he formed Le Bon Vent, a sextet specializing in Breton and French music. He has recorded nine CDs with these and other musicians. www.jeremiahmclane.com
     
  • Claude Méthé

    Claude Méthé, is a self-taught fiddler, his style reflects most particularly the eighteen years he lived in the region of Lotbinière, Québec, on the south side of the St-Lawrence river not far from Québec City. Today, he resides in Ste-Béatrix, Québec, in the Lanaudière region, known worldwide as the epicenter of Québec trad music. (more)
     
  • Kaity Newell

    Kaity teaches fiddle in Damariscotta and has played for dances for many years with The Maine Country Dance Orchestra, and with the band The Lady Bugs. A native of Great Britain, Kaity has brought many a fine tune from the British Isles to our local dances. Kaity also plays viola in the local community orchestra and has four children, all of whom play music and come to camp every year. 7 Creek Lane Damariscotta ME 044543 207-563-8440
     
  • Bill Olson

    Bill Olson teaches both guitar and upright bass at Maine Fiddle Camp. He is probably best known at home and abroad as a contradance caller and choreographer. Bill has played and called for dances in 25 states and his dance compositions, known for their high potential energy and excellent flow, and are called by contradance callers all over the world. Bill started playing guitar in 1958, dancing in 1976, calling in 1985, and playing bass in 1993. He has been singing all his life.
     
  • Ed Pearlman

    Ed Pearlman enjoys many styles of fiddle music but is best known for Scottish and Cape Breton fiddling, often working with his wife, dancer Laura Scott, and their family band, Highland Soles (www.highlandsoles.com). Since the mid 1990s, he has taught fiddle in Portland, and written the music column for Scottish Life magazine. Ed has worked closely with top artists such as Alasdair Fraser, Natalie MacMaster, Tony Cuffe, Aly Bain, Jerry Holland and many others, especially when he directed the Boston Scottish Fiddle Club, 1981-99. His latest CD is On the Edge with son Neil on piano. Ed has played various Celtic and American styles, Eastern European and classical. For more info & some fiddling resources, see http://www.edpearlman.net - 207-650-2030
     
  • Neil Pearlman

    Neil Pearlman is emerging as one of the traditional music scene's most innovative young artists. Legendary Cape Breton fiddler Jerry Holland said that "watching Neil's hands on the piano is like watching two spiders on crack!" His piano style is rooted in Cape Breton traditions while drawing on latin, jazz and funk influences. The result is a exciting new sound that remains true to its traditional roots. An accomplished Cape Breton step dancer and mandolinist as well, Neil grew up in the family band Highland Soles and (more)
     
  • Julia Plumb

    Julia lives and teaches fiddle and clawhammer banjo in Belfast, Maine. Equally at home on the stage and on the dance floor, Julia loves the percussive interplay between traditional music and dance forms and has enjoyed soaking up bits and pieces from players and dancers throughout New England and in Québec, Ireland, Brittany, and the southern Appalachians. Julia plays with Baron Collins-Hill in their duo Velocipede (www.velocipedemusic.com) and loves connecting people with music and dance. In addition to teaching at camps and in face-to-face lessons, Julia maintains freefiddlelessons.com, where she creates YouTube fiddle lesson videos and learning materials. Julia has achieved her 2010 goal to make her life more like Maine Fiddle Camp!
     
  • Doug Protsik

    Doug ProtsikDoug likes to play the "old-time piano" for dances, melodramas, honky tonk saloons, and silent movies. He learned his style from Otto Soper, Geneva Walton, and Danny Patt among many others. He plays with Old Grey Goose and produced all three of their recordings, including the group’s first recording in 1978 for Folkways, "Old Time Country Dance Tunes and Songs from Maine", now available again on CD. Doug also plays piano, accordion, and fiddle. He is the Camp Director again this year.  116 Pleasant Cove Dr. Woolwich ME O4579 207-443-5411
     
  • Sharon Pyne

    Sharon has been a student of tin whistle and wooden flute since 1977 when she attended the Willy Clancy Summer School while working in Ireland for the year. On her return to Boston to care for her grandmother, she studied with master flute players in the Hanafin /Cooley Comhalthus branch. She move to Maine to raise her children and became a member of the Portland Ceili Band and Ladies of the Lake. She runs a music studio in Bath, Maine where she teaches flute and whistle and Music Together. For a few months every year since 2000, she happily lives and breathes Maine Fiddle alongside director Doug Protsik.  Sharon can be contacted at email hidden; JavaScript is required or 207-522-3900.
     
  • Nicole Rabata

    Irish flutist Nicole Rabata is highly regarded both in and out of traditional music fields. She has toured America and Europe including appearances at International Flute Festivals in Stockholm and Lund (Sweden), Temple Bar Trad Fest in Dublin, the Hebridean Celtic Festival in Scotland, Interharmony International Music Festival in Bavaria, the National Flute Conventions in NYC and San Diego, WOMAD Festival in the UK and the Festival Interceltique du L’Orient in Brittany among others. (more)
     
  • Alden Robinson

    Alden Robinson learned to play the fiddle as a child growing up in coastal Maine. His earliest lessons came from Tamora Goltz, Katie Newell, and from the teachers at Maine Fiddle Camp. In college, he studied Irish fiddle in Ireland at University College Cork, and in several pubs. For the past five years or so he has toured and recorded with The Press Gang, an Irish trad band from Portland. He also loves playing for contra dances and performs to several dance bands, including "Riptide", which features Owen Marshall and Glen Loper. (more)
     
  • Beth Robinson

    Classically trained cellist Beth Robinson has been teaching cello to students ages 4-adult for nearly 30 years. Based in Potsdam, NY, she began playing for dances in the late 1980’s at a time when there were few cellists to guide her and so she looked to other instrumentalists for inspiration. Her mentors and teachers include fiddlers David Kaynor, George Wilson, Claude Methe, pianist Jacqueline Schwab, and guitarists Dana Whittle and Paul Marchand. (more)
     
  • Maggie Robinson

     
  • Cindy Roy

    Cindy is an accomplished piano accompanist and stepdancer and has collaborated with her husband, Don Roy on numerous recordings and performances. 114 Plummer Rd. Gorham ME. 04038 892-3512
     
  • Don Roy

    Don learned how to play the fiddle from his Uncle, Lucien Mathieu when he was 15 years old, and soon after became influenced by his fiddling friends Ben Guillemette, Joe and Gerry Robichaud, and Graham Townsend. His personal style would show strong influence from the Canadian provinces and Northern Ireland. Don started and managed The Maine French Fiddlers with his wife Cindy, an accomplished piano accompanist and stepdancer, for 11 years during which he played such venues as Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Barns at Wolf Trap, Prairie Home Companion. (more)
     
  • Lissa Schneckenburger

    A new England fiddler and folk singer, Lissa grew up in Maine as an active member of the folk music and dance community, where she cut her teeth as a musician at a very young age. She has continued to explore music throughout her life, leading to her graduation from The New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Massachusetts (2001). Her list of mentors includes Greg Boardman, Alasdair Fraser, David Kaynor, and Hankus Netsky. While embracing a diverse pallet of musical influences, she still stays true to her New England roots. For more info on Lissa, check out her website at www.lissafiddle.com
     
  • Fiona Schubeck

    Fiona picked up the fiddle at age two, and learned her first fiddle tunes from her father Bill Schubeck when she was four. She grew up with classical Suzuki training and joined the family contradance band in high school, playing for the Blue Hill dances every month. She went on to study at Berklee School of Music in Boston for one semester and continues to play for dances and weddings with various groups.  She first attended Maine fiddle camp in 2004, came back the next year to teach and has been calling it home every since.
     
  • David Surette

    One of New England's finest guitarists, David Surette has been quietly generating a growing following for his work as a soloist. His solo albums "Back Roads" and "Trip to Kemper" have helped to establish him as a top player and arranger of Celtic fingerstyle guitar, yet his diverse repertoire also includes original compositions, blues and ragtime, traditional American roots music, and folk music from a variety of traditions, all played with finesse, taste, and virtuosity. He is equally at home on the mandolin and bouzouki, and is well-known as a top-notch accompanist in New England's contra dance and Celtic music circles, and is also in demand as a studio musician and sideman. www.burkesurette.com
     
  • Julie Vallimont

    Julie Vallimont performs nationwide on piano and accordion with the bands Buddy System and Nor’easter and other collaborations.  She plays for contra, English, and French dancing.   A former classical pianist and organist, she fell in love with traditional music and dance, and since then has gone on to perform at numerous festivals and music camps.  Drawing on teaching skills developed over fifteen years as a natural science educator, Julie enjoys teaching and leading workshops. 

     
  • Pam Weeks

    Pam sings and plays several instruments in the folk trio, T-Acadie, is fiddler and singer for the Maine-based Cajun dance band, Jimmyjo & the Jumbol'Ayuhs, plays fiddle and mountain dulcimer in the contradance band, Scrod Pudding, and performs solo or with guitar player and caller Bill Olson. She is an accomplished tunesmith and has composed scores of tunes, from lively jigs and reels, to entrancing airs and beautiful waltzes. Pam has toured throughout the U.S. with her bands, playing for contradances, concerts, and teaching at festivals and workshops. (more)
     
  • Steven Weiss

    Steven Weiss began blowing harmonica when he was four years old. His father and grandfather both played the mouth organ as well. Growing up in the more popular cross-harp rock/blues/boogies styles, he began playing straight harp (melodies rather than chords or blues)- traditional, mostly old-timey, tunes on the harmonica in 1970, hanging out with southern tow boat pilots on the Ohio River near where he went to college. This was followed by many years living in Maine playing for contradances, folk clubs, concerts, festivals and playing back-up for other performers. (more)